Radon Gas and Lung Cancer

When you hear the term ‘lung cancer’ a lot may come to mind. More often than not, we think of cigarettes, and their dangers. You may also think of coal miners, or gases that industry specific professionals are exposed to. While these are all serious risks that you should be aware of, you may be shocked to realize that studies have shown that 16% of all lung cancer cases actually come from radon gas.

That’s right, breathing the air right in your own home is the culprit of 16% of all lung cancer cases. If someone were to tell you that the indoor air quality in the homes of American’s was the culprit of 16% of all lung cancer cases, one would be curious if all American’s lived next to a power plant or industrial factory.

Even though many of our homes are in scenic, suburban landscapes, the trouble lies within the soil where radon gas forms. Radon is both colorless, and odorless, so there is no telling whether or not your home is affected without having a professional test. To put it in perspective, over 20,000 people die from radon gas each year. That is more than drunk driving, and many other serious causes of death. One out of every fifteen homes has high levels of radon gas, meaning that there is a pretty good chance more than a handful of people in your neighborhood, or on your street, may be negatively affected by radon gas.

Radon Gas Mitigation Process

In order to understand the radon gas mitigation process, you must first understand where radon gas comes from. Radon comes from the uranium which breaks down in your soil. As radon gas forms, it is in a gaseous state. As you may already know, gases may easily enter your home through small spaces in the foundation or basement. Another entry point is through your water supply. Even if your home specifically does not have a lot of uranium in its soil, there may be radon near a section of the ground water which is used for your county. This could lead to radon gas entering straight through your faucet.

Once you receive your test results, you will have a better idea of your threat level. If your tests show high levels of radon gas, you know that you simply have to call a professional, such as RadonHjelpen, if you do not want to risk the health of yourself and your family. Even if your home does not have high levels of radon gas, you may still want to call a professional, as a radon gas mitigation system can provide the mitigation you need and security for the future. A properly installed mitigation system can reduce radon gas levels by as much as 99%.

Fire Safety in Welding

Fire safety is important to know especially if your a welder (for obvious reasons). Knowing how a fire starts and how to stop it could on day save your life or others, I know it certainly has mine.

Fire triangle

This is a fire triangle. All three components are needed to create the fire. Take one away and you’ll extinguish the fire. There are 3 good ways to kill a fire. Starve it, cool it, or smother it.

1-Starve it by cutting it off at the the fuel source eg. shutting off the cylinder valve.

2-Cool it by throwing water on it.

3-Smothering it will restrict the oxygen. you can use a wet blanket, sand, fire extinguisher, or if you become a human torch the stop, drop and roll technique should work.

Fire Extinguishers

There are different classes of fires A,B,C, and D.

A – Ordinary combustibles

B – Flammable liquids and gases

C – Energized electrical equipment

D – Combustible metals

I’m not going to go into great detail about the fire extinguisher. All you really have to know is what kind of fire your dealing with and make sure you have the appropriate fire extinguisher. The best one to get would be an ABC extinguisher, unless of course you plan on working with combustible metals like zirconium or magnesium. Then it would be a good idea to have a D fire extinguisher on hand. All welding shops Perth and in the rest of the country are required to have all the safety measures taken care of.

Potential fire safety hazards

Always be aware of your surroundings before you start to weld or torch cut. It’s always a good idea to move anything that looks like it could blow up or catch fire. If you can’t move it then move your work piece, if you can’t do either then block it with something to keep the sparks away like piece of ply wood.

Other potential hazards you should be aware of are the clothes you wear. Are your pants frayed at the bottom? It might look like no big deal until your welding and your wondering why your leg feels hot all of a sudden.

Sparks fly everywhere and if your not properly dressed sparks can find themselves in the most inconvenient places. So cover up properly. Do up your boots and don’t tuck your in shirt. If a spark manages to find its way down your shirt it’s easier to help it find it’s way out.

Fire safety knowledge will help keep you safe from getting any nasty burns.

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